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OPEN TRANSCRIPT...

OPEN TRANSCRIPT

00:00
welcome to global entrepreneurship week
00:02
honored to be here i'm rob richardson
00:04
you're you're a moderator
00:05
with disruption now with me is uh raz
00:08
assan with bro
00:09
capital pam davis with hidden spirits
00:12
cocktails
00:13
and my man doug mccalla the cio of the
00:16
city of dublin
00:17
how are you all doing today you all look
00:18
great all right all right
00:20
you're doing good appreciate it how you
00:22
doing
00:23
good well look we're here to talk about
00:25
what it means to be a change agent we
00:27
have change agents here you guys are
00:29
you go i'm claiming the title if you
00:30
didn't think you're a change agent now
00:31
you are a change agent and we're going
00:32
to talk about what it means to be a
00:34
change agent
00:35
um you know that's that's a sexy term
00:37
people like to say that they're a change
00:39
agent that they're a leader
00:40
truth be told it's really hard to be a
00:42
leader it's even harder to be
00:43
a change agent leader and if you uh
00:47
factor on top of happen to be happen to
00:50
be black
00:51
it has other little complications that
00:52
can come there so it's it's something
00:54
that people like to aspire to be
00:56
but if you've had to do it if you've
00:57
been in leadership positions which you
00:59
all have you know how challenging
01:01
how challenging it can be and um
01:04
and the challenges that that presents on
01:06
a day by day or organization by
01:08
organization
01:09
basis uh so thinking about that what do
01:12
you think
01:13
is the most important quality to have
01:16
in a leader particularly in a change
01:18
leader
01:19
anybody can take that yeah uh
01:23
i guess i can kick it off so i think
01:26
for me it's been resilience
01:29
and patience a lot of times when you're
01:31
trying to impact
01:32
change you have to realize it's
01:35
something that's not going to happen
01:36
overnight
01:37
and so you're going to have some days
01:40
that are really tough
01:41
and you know it's going to be hard to
01:43
get through and then you're going to
01:44
have other days that are maybe a little
01:46
bit easier and you see the progress
01:48
you have to allow those progressive days
01:51
to fuel
01:52
those tough days because a lot of times
01:54
you will want to
01:55
just be like why why am i doing this
01:59
yeah can you give me an example of
02:00
sometimes you you felt like that i do
02:02
think when people
02:03
hear about an example from a leader
02:07
and they've seen that okay they've come
02:09
through a stage where they were
02:10
vulnerable where they
02:12
had a misstep like can you think of
02:13
something and specifically that might
02:15
stand out in your mind like when you
02:16
thought about something it was like you
02:18
didn't you were in that moment
02:19
and you had to think about it for the
02:21
long term because in that moment it's
02:23
just like why why am i doing this
02:25
yeah so lots of lots of examples
02:29
um because i am like i guess owner
02:32
give you a little bit of background
02:34
about me owner and founder of a spirits
02:36
company in northeast ohio
02:38
and one of the only black females in the
02:41
nation
02:42
with the liquor license and just going
02:44
through the whole process
02:45
was difficult trying to find other
02:48
people in the industry
02:50
that are doing it there's nobody that
02:51
looks like me and so
02:53
you know you're one of the first and so
02:55
you're leaning on a lot of um
02:57
white men to kind of help you out and
02:59
kind of learn the ropes
03:01
and so as you're going through all of
03:03
that there's a lot of things that can be
03:05
deep motivating in terms of you know
03:07
it's already hard being an entrepreneur
03:09
in itself because a lot of people don't
03:11
understand that journey it's a lot
03:12
different than the corporate america
03:14
journey
03:14
yeah and it gets very lonely and then
03:17
when you're the only person that looks
03:18
like you on that journey
03:20
and then you have you know
03:23
not just not just white men but
03:26
everybody asking you why are you doing
03:28
this what are you trying to create
03:30
you know it's the spirits industry so
03:32
why do you want to be you know there's
03:33
some people that think it's
03:34
controversial you're trying to kill your
03:36
people and put bad things into the
03:38
environment and things like that so
03:40
there's just a lot of challenges along
03:42
the way
03:43
um and not having
03:46
always the support system yeah being a
03:49
part of that lonely journey
03:51
you know you have to motivate yourself
03:52
and you have to try to surround yourself
03:54
with other positive people and other
03:56
people who are doing positive things in
03:58
the community
04:00
who are building businesses who are
04:01
trying to stimulate the economy
04:04
uh and things like that so it just it
04:06
can be a very lonely road
04:08
and on that road it just requires a lot
04:10
of resilience and a lot of patience
04:13
and you have to be the change that you
04:15
want to see
04:16
so you know i have four
04:19
black daughters and so you know i might
04:22
be
04:22
one of very few black women in this
04:24
industry but now i have four girls that
04:26
i've raised that know that they could do
04:28
the same thing that's awesome whether
04:30
it's spirits or whether it's some other
04:32
industry
04:33
yeah right so it's just opening that
04:34
door and being the change that you want
04:36
to see
04:36
so that you can inspire the next
04:38
generation yeah i mean i hear you
04:40
um when we talk when people uh view
04:44
entrepreneurship i think it's viewed a
04:46
very very
04:47
glorious and sexy right now not that
04:49
it's not that
04:50
it can be a great thing because it can
04:51
be but yeah i think people view it from
04:54
just seeing the rewards just like oh
04:56
okay or seeing the apparent awards i
04:58
should say because most people are
04:59
fronting if we're
05:00
really honest yeah they're pretending
05:02
about what's happening in
05:03
entrepreneurship they they talk about
05:05
oh the proceeds and this they rarely
05:07
talk about the process they rarely talk
05:09
about the pain
05:10
and and it's real and that's why when
05:12
you said it's a lonely process
05:14
leadership in general is a lonely
05:15
process and entrepreneurship is is even
05:17
lonelier because
05:18
you have to build the team like there's
05:20
not a team around you automatically it's
05:21
you
05:22
building the team and figuring out and
05:23
building that ecosystem
05:25
uh you know uh roz thinking about that
05:27
and building an ecosystem
05:28
i know bro capital is is trying to do
05:30
that it's not trying to do it you're
05:32
doing that
05:32
you're not doing triad you have you're
05:34
built you have the organization you're
05:35
building it
05:36
uh talk about the importance of building
05:39
that ecosystem particularly with
05:40
entrepreneurs and really changing the
05:42
mindset when it comes to black
05:44
entrepreneurs
05:45
i know that's a lot of what you focus on
05:47
great man uh
05:48
certainly appreciate you having me here
05:50
rob um and that was a great segue
05:53
from what uh she was just explaining
05:55
around
05:56
you know you you really have to have
05:59
that resilience and that compassion and
06:01
really that uh that fire within you
06:03
to be able to communicate that to the
06:06
members of your team
06:07
whether that be through actions or just
06:10
through verbal communication
06:12
and i think for broke capital
06:15
facilitating an environment to where
06:17
collaboration is just germane to the
06:20
culture is extremely important
06:22
um and and of course project management
06:26
right to where uh having goals but not
06:30
being able to move those goals or being
06:32
able to move the needle on those goals
06:33
is important
06:34
and being able to have multiple teams
06:37
cross-functionally working with each
06:39
other to move an
06:40
organizational goal forward is extremely
06:42
important so that's kind of
06:43
you know one of the things that i've
06:45
learned while building out this
06:46
ecosystem
06:48
is really creating systems so that
06:50
people can
06:51
be productive inside of them yeah so
06:54
what is bro capital because i think
06:55
people need to
06:56
tell us a little bit about it i mean
06:57
what what is it what's your aim that
06:59
you're trying to do what are you
07:01
trying to shape with with broken
07:03
withdrawal capital
07:04
certainly so broke capital is the
07:06
world's first
07:07
cooperatively owned and operated
07:10
financial
07:11
technology company specifically designed
07:14
to increase black man's financial
07:15
wellness
07:16
right so what we are accomplishing
07:20
is there's a chasm in between financial
07:24
literacy
07:25
and financial independence right both of
07:27
them are rather
07:28
nebulous concepts right of just
07:32
knowing information to actually live in
07:33
that lifestyle right there's something
07:35
in the middle that has to take place
07:37
so that's where bro capital comes in and
07:39
we offer
07:41
a curated social community and we're
07:43
that place that aggregates
07:44
all forms of capital for black men so of
07:47
course financial capital
07:48
is the one that we often think of but
07:50
you've got you know a bevy of forms of
07:52
capital really we move off the eight
07:53
forms of capital model
07:55
including cultural capital intellectual
07:57
capital spiritual capital
07:59
natural capital so on and so forth right
08:02
um
08:02
and so we offer automated asset
08:05
accumulation
08:06
right which is essentially automating
08:08
your savings but also
08:10
beyond that bringing and leveraging the
08:12
savings
08:13
of your peer group right so it's that
08:16
cultural community
08:17
um automated asset accumulation as well
08:20
as
08:20
education and resources so if you got
08:22
some money in your pocket
08:23
you've got some knowledge and you've got
08:25
some connections
08:27
now you're really cooking with oil and
08:28
able to make some moves right i think
08:30
that's good i want to come back to that
08:31
there's a lot that you've just triggered
08:33
in my brain that i want to
08:34
have a discussion with you as we talk
08:35
about change and i think you're talking
08:38
internally how does the black community
08:40
itself not externally looking for
08:43
change in the system not that we
08:44
shouldn't but what can we do to control
08:46
to control the controllables which is
08:48
our internal community but i want to get
08:49
to that
08:50
and i want to get to that discussion but
08:51
i want to get to doug because doug
08:53
uh you uniquely of everybody on the
08:55
panel
08:56
uh you're not an entrepreneur but you're
08:58
in a system that you've
08:59
you've worked i think to help bring
09:01
about change
09:02
uh to have a perspective to be inclusive
09:05
i i don't know
09:06
i don't know what the city of dublin's
09:07
relation uh you know their their general
09:10
uh you know uh theme or or or
09:13
uh i should say what word am i looking
09:15
for their reputation was before you
09:18
i can i can say with you it is known to
09:20
be
09:21
an inclusive environment that's working
09:22
to be innovative and perhaps that was
09:24
true before but
09:26
i only know it to be true because of you
09:28
now i'll say like what
09:29
what what advice would you give to a
09:31
change leader
09:32
who's in an environment where it might
09:34
be something new that they're inter that
09:35
they're
09:36
trying to introduce or an environment
09:38
that is
09:39
that is resisted to change because
09:41
people say they like change but
09:43
people uh will hold on to the status quo
09:45
and the data shows this even when it
09:47
doesn't help them just because
09:49
they're used to the status quo how how
09:52
how did you do it and how do you advise
09:53
leaders that are seeking to change to go
09:55
about
09:55
uh changing an environment that either
09:58
is not used to change or is resistant to
10:00
change
10:01
yeah i appreciate that question and
10:03
you're absolutely right about people's
10:04
attitudes towards change
10:05
we all want change in other people and
10:08
we do not want to change ourselves
10:10
and when change arrives at our own
10:12
doorstep we tend to be resistant
10:14
and we just need to deal with that and i
10:17
i am an entrepreneur
10:18
and uh but i got a lot of stuff to catch
10:20
up with you gone rob so
10:23
future conversation that's future
10:26
okay that absolutely there is too much
10:28
to be done out here for any of us to not
10:30
be an entrepreneur and i hope that
10:32
anyone who doesn't consider themselves
10:34
one
10:34
make sure you're involved i'll phrase
10:36
that right no matter what you have an
10:37
entrepreneurial mindset because you do
10:38
because you think like an innovator and
10:40
you do things
10:41
what i meant to say is you're you're in
10:43
a more structured environment you're a
10:44
cio of a large organization
10:46
which is a little different than you're
10:47
uh you're absolutely right yeah
10:49
you've named it correctly and everything
10:51
in addition to being the cio
10:53
of the city of dublin i am uh a
10:55
co-founder of an organization called
10:57
black tech columbus as well
10:58
which is not a business it's a informal
11:01
network
11:02
of black technology professionals um and
11:05
in in those roles i i think of myself as
11:08
an advocate
11:09
and a thought leader in trying to push
11:11
whether it be
11:12
for uh the workforce and workforce
11:16
development economic development those
11:17
kinds of things
11:19
um we could talk about also whether or
11:21
not the city i work for
11:23
was known as an inclusive environment
11:26
beforehand
11:27
as well it it's not something that
11:29
cities typically do
11:31
they should and we need to have our our
11:34
public sector kind of doing that kind of
11:35
thing
11:36
but it had not been the case before the
11:38
word i thought of when you started
11:39
talking about change
11:41
was authenticity and i totally agree
11:44
with the other panelists and what
11:45
they've said about
11:46
uh change whether it be resilience or
11:48
also building systems as ross has said
11:51
but um i'm bringing up authenticity
11:53
because typically
11:54
a lot of this change it involves people
11:57
and
11:58
multiple people and groups and
12:00
organizing
12:01
have to be a part of change and people
12:03
can tell when you're inauthentic
12:05
and they're not going to follow you or
12:07
follow your ideas and so i think
12:09
part of the beginning of change in
12:11
making it happen has to do with
12:14
creating support and developing a
12:17
narrative
12:18
and picturing the in-state that you're
12:21
really going for
12:22
and selling that narrative amongst all
12:24
the people who are and
12:26
really and i i feel like we're good at
12:28
movement that's what
12:29
change requires and it may be a very
12:31
small movement um
12:33
but i believe ultimately you have to
12:35
build a movement and change hearts
12:37
so that people can see the value in it
12:39
and the advantages to themselves
12:41
and then if we all align on our own
12:44
advantages
12:44
then we can have collective advantages
12:47
like that and i want to give a shout out
12:48
also to pam
12:49
and being in the spirits business
12:51
because i was in state government before
12:54
city government
12:55
and i worked in the department of
12:56
commerce which she will know
12:58
as the liquor database and uh the state
13:01
of ohio
13:02
being in spirits in ohio is different
13:04
from being in spirits in other states
13:07
because the state of ohio is the only
13:09
real licensed
13:10
uh organization to sell spirits and so
13:13
everybody else has to work with them so
13:16
um
13:17
hats off to you pam for fighting that
13:19
good fight it is a very
13:21
uh hard industry to be in and so
13:24
i just want to shout out to you for that
13:26
doug i have a follow-up question to
13:27
what you just said then i want to go to
13:29
roz and then to pay him on some stuff so
13:31
being authentic that's that's advice i
13:33
hear people say a lot
13:35
and i don't disagree with you talk to
13:38
people about like well but what does
13:39
that mean like how do you how do you how
13:41
do you seek to be your authentic self
13:42
sounds easy but
13:44
i don't consider a whole lot of people
13:45
authentic and again people don't usually
13:47
have the
13:48
courage i guess or the know-how to be
13:51
their
13:52
authentic self what does that mean and
13:54
how practically do you go about
13:56
developing that muscle if there is an
13:58
ability to do that
13:59
yeah it certainly is not easy at all and
14:02
uh i believe that this is self work
14:04
and i don't hold myself up as the
14:06
example of this is how you
14:08
are authentic but i practice every day
14:11
i get up and when i'm speaking to people
14:13
and when i'm trying to be honest with
14:15
people
14:16
and trying to present my honest self
14:18
what i have learned is that
14:20
ultimately usually i'm if i'm struggling
14:22
with it it's because i'm not being
14:23
honest with myself
14:25
and so really every day i need to think
14:27
about when i advocate
14:28
uh i sometimes advocate for black people
14:32
and say you know this is what we need
14:36
but i'm not speaking authentically and i
14:38
need to get right in my own heart and
14:40
say well this is why i'm talking this
14:41
way
14:42
and when i start thinking about my
14:43
uncles who uh
14:46
integrated the uh pipefitters union in
14:48
detroit they were the first
14:50
american men to to do that and i think
14:53
about my
14:53
own path no easy task we think of the
14:57
unions in a certain way today
14:59
but in the 50s and 60s it was not that
15:01
way um
15:03
when i think about my grandfather who
15:04
owned a dry cleaning business and and
15:06
struggled to
15:07
build a better life for his children i
15:10
think about
15:10
i'm from detroit i think about people
15:13
like that
15:13
and and that makes me feel more
15:15
authentic and i try to bring that to the
15:18
fore
15:18
and it's kind of like you know a dog can
15:20
smell fear
15:22
you know they kind of know when you fear
15:23
them uh people can smell fear
15:26
too they can just smell it they just
15:28
feel it and so when you are authentic
15:30
with yourself
15:30
and bringing your real truth to the
15:32
table i feel like uh
15:35
uh that's how you do it but i again
15:38
it's something that i struggle with
15:40
every day in every interaction with
15:42
other people
15:42
when i meet people and you know it's a
15:45
practice
15:46
it's it's not every anything you're ever
15:48
really done with
15:50
yeah roz when i think about what you're
15:52
trying to do
15:53
the goal it seems and you can correct me
15:55
if i'm wrong is to
15:56
continually build the community but that
15:59
to work to change the narrative to
16:01
change the direction
16:02
i'm sure you know this study i can't
16:04
remember the exact year might be 2050
16:07
but uh median black uh wealth is
16:10
projected to go to
16:11
zero and uh if you dive down into that
16:14
study
16:15
it has a lot to do with the income of
16:17
black men that that's
16:19
almost all almost exclusively so what
16:21
you're doing is needed
16:22
but it sounds like to what you're what
16:24
you're doing is making sure that we're
16:25
changing the narrative and building
16:27
trust amongst the community but there's
16:29
also if we're honest there's probably
16:31
some distrust
16:32
in the community and so how how do you
16:35
use how do you open yourself to be
16:37
vulnerable uh to figure out how to
16:40
change that narrative as a community
16:42
knowing that some might be resistant to
16:44
it not because it's not the right thing
16:45
to do
16:46
because it's different man that's a
16:49
great
16:50
question i wanted to uh really allude to
16:52
what pam was saying earlier
16:53
around you know the qualities that are
16:56
important
16:57
to have one of those things in
16:59
conjunction with with resilience for
17:01
sure
17:01
is compassion right because when you're
17:03
trying to make change you're working
17:05
with a population oftentimes that may
17:07
not even understand
17:08
truly the value and the impact that
17:10
you're trying to bring to them right
17:12
and so um i've had experience i
17:14
understand
17:16
the same experience you yeah what i mean
17:19
your stuff spoke to me so i i figured
17:21
you'd understand the question
17:22
exactly so so so like you say man just
17:25
being uh being vulnerable being
17:26
transparent
17:27
um and also just being like i say
17:30
compassionate
17:31
understanding that you know it's going
17:33
to take time that people may not get it
17:35
um that's that's pretty much the best i
17:38
can say and also
17:39
having a core value structure right your
17:42
morals as we're building an institution
17:44
right institution is only as good as the
17:46
people
17:47
who are building it what are your morals
17:48
like what are your ethics like so
17:50
for us transparency and communication
17:53
are extremely important
17:54
and creating an environment to where
17:56
again you know we can have
17:58
harvard lawyers and battle rappers and
18:01
school principals and
18:03
construction workers everybody come
18:04
together with their own area of
18:06
expertise
18:07
to really you know work together and as
18:09
you mentioned
18:10
trust that's extremely important
18:13
not only in finance extremely important
18:15
in finance but you know in business in
18:17
general and so
18:18
if you think about it roz not to
18:20
interrupt you but
18:21
finance only works through trust it only
18:24
works to trust people don't
18:25
like people would think about money
18:26
money money only works because people
18:28
trusted will
18:29
money only exchanges because people
18:31
trust that it will exactly so
18:33
if you don't have trust there's no if if
18:35
right now
18:36
people didn't believe in the full faith
18:38
and credit of the united states
18:40
everything would fall apart in the
18:41
united states the part is it's on his
18:43
way right now
18:43
yeah that's well like i would hopefully
18:46
not but go ahead finish
18:48
i'm not gonna go too far down that for
18:50
that rabbit hole but go ahead
18:52
yeah man so so yeah having having trust
18:54
that's one of those double entendres
18:55
when it comes to our business for sure
18:57
because you know you're talking about
18:58
the financial trust and you're also
19:00
talking about right the relationship
19:01
level of trust and so right
19:03
i'm you know going back to what doug was
19:04
saying being your authentic self right
19:06
me showing up as
19:08
who i truly am right and like you say
19:10
people can smell that and so
19:11
when they come around and i'm really
19:13
being me and it's like okay right mary
19:14
and williams say it gives them the
19:16
opportunity
19:17
to share their light as well and
19:19
sometimes people and i want to get to
19:20
pay them next but sometimes people
19:22
are intimidated by you being your
19:25
authentic self i can i guess
19:27
i can speak for me like so i i can say
19:30
that
19:30
i work to be authentic i'm not saying
19:32
i'm perfect but i i work
19:34
as much as i can and i'm not perfect
19:36
i've done things wrong but generally i
19:37
try to
19:38
really be myself and be transparent who
19:41
i am and what i'm seeking to do
19:42
and why i'm doing it and i think some
19:45
people
19:46
who are not that way are
19:49
fearful of that and sometimes fight back
19:51
against you because of that
19:53
i'm not sure if you've seen that before
19:55
uh but
19:56
i'm curious if you have how you've dealt
19:58
with this so hold on to that because i
19:59
want to go to pam real quick and then
20:00
we're going to come back to that pam
20:02
how do you deal with you're in an
20:05
industry you've said it
20:06
that uh doesn't see a lot of not only
20:09
black people but black women in the
20:11
industry period right
20:12
uh how do you deal with navigating
20:16
the uh the the the defeat the
20:20
the feedback the criticism the
20:22
stereotypes that come with that
20:24
and how do you make sure you don't
20:26
absorb it to get impostor syndrome as
20:28
you move forward
20:30
yeah no that's a that's a great question
20:33
and
20:35
um it does come back to a lot of what
20:37
doug and raza said
20:38
the authenticity is is key
20:42
um but i think authenticity comes with
20:45
a level of self-awareness so
20:49
um and that's that's what's hard for
20:51
people how do you define self-awareness
20:53
what's your definition so just
20:54
knowing yourself because the reason
20:57
it's you know the reason it becomes
21:00
difficult to show up
21:02
as you every day is because sometimes
21:03
people don't they're not even aware of
21:05
who they are
21:06
they're so busy trying to mimic what
21:08
they see out in
21:10
society or what they think they should
21:12
be or what their parents told them they
21:13
should be
21:14
and so you have all these influences
21:16
around you and a lot of times we grow up
21:20
mimicking those things yeah instead of
21:23
really trying to take a moment and
21:24
figure out who we are
21:26
what motivates us what makes us happy
21:28
what do we want out of life
21:30
and so when you don't know the answer is
21:32
hard to show up being authentic to who
21:34
you are
21:35
and so that's a journey that you have to
21:37
go on for yourself
21:39
and you know i've been blessed enough to
21:41
go on that journey
21:43
mine started in a corporate career and
21:46
you know i remember when i started my
21:48
corporate career
21:49
i would show up as you know whatever
21:52
position i wanted to aspire to become
21:55
i wanted to be a vice president or a cio
21:57
or you know i wanted i wanted to be a
21:59
part of the leadership
22:00
team and so i would look at the leaders
22:02
that were up there
22:04
a lot of which did not look like me were
22:07
white men and women and so i thought
22:10
that i had to act like that
22:12
in order to get to those positions and
22:15
then over time
22:16
you just you start to learn as you get
22:18
more confident
22:20
and comfortable in who you are and what
22:21
you can produce as a human
22:24
you start to realize that okay the thing
22:28
that makes most
22:29
companies that are very successful
22:30
special is the diversity
22:32
and that you bring that level of
22:34
diversity if you do show up as yourself
22:37
right and so as you continue to get
22:39
comfortable with that as you continue to
22:41
bring other leaders
22:42
along with you and you start to mentor
22:45
and do all of those things then you
22:47
start to truly develop who you are as a
22:49
leader and you just hone in on those
22:51
skills you continue to educate yourself
22:54
you continue to you know invest in
22:56
yourself
22:57
and after a while you get more and more
22:59
comfortable and
23:00
showing up at as yourself until one day
23:03
i think it just clicked for me it just
23:05
clicked
23:05
sure like i don't have to be that guy or
23:08
that girl
23:09
i can just be pam and pam can be
23:12
inappropriate or pam can be super
23:15
professional and polished right yeah
23:19
there's there's different um there's
23:22
different parts of my personality you
23:24
know and
23:24
it's just like in your relationships
23:26
when i'm a mom i'm a different person
23:28
than when i'm a wife
23:30
i'm a different person than when i am a
23:32
ceo or a founder
23:34
right and so when you start to embrace
23:36
all those pieces of who you are then
23:38
that allows you to start to show up as
23:40
your authentic self and you get
23:41
comfortable doing that
23:43
and then over time if you're comfortable
23:46
with that
23:47
other people start to become comfortable
23:49
with that
23:50
if i can i'd like to have a different
23:52
point on that because i i believe you're
23:54
correct
23:56
what i what i believe is the challenge
23:58
and i've gone through this personally
23:59
and i
24:00
and i'm sure a lot of black people i'm
24:02
sure women have gone through this too
24:04
and if you're in the wrong environment
24:06
though
24:08
it can reinforce bad things in your
24:11
brain you know there
24:12
there's a study that was shown that the
24:15
people you literally hang around
24:17
your brain rewires itself to think like
24:20
them even if you think you're not going
24:21
to
24:22
eventually you will like your mind will
24:24
change and the synopsis will change and
24:26
you will
24:27
be able to you'll start forming thought
24:29
patterns like the people around you so
24:32
what about the environment that you have
24:34
around you because if you're in a
24:35
corporate environment
24:36
that doesn't you can say they support
24:38
you can be this person that believes in
24:40
yourself
24:41
and all that but you're in an
24:42
environment where people are tearing you
24:43
down
24:45
it's harder i'm not saying it's
24:47
impossible but i'm saying like
24:49
what to make of the environment like do
24:51
you get to a point have you been in an
24:52
environment like that and what did you
24:53
do about the situation in order to
24:56
either cope or thrive yeah well there's
24:58
there's a saying and i'm probably gonna
25:00
screw it up but it's like you are the
25:02
sum of the five people that you spend
25:04
the most time with so i've heard that
25:05
several times and i believe that to be
25:07
true
25:08
and yeah being a black person in america
25:11
is hard right so ben i mean
25:14
i i think we learned how to deal with
25:17
you know i grew up in the inner city of
25:19
detroit that was hard
25:20
i grew up with drug dealers on my corner
25:23
that was hard
25:24
right so you you learn how to deal with
25:26
things that are hard
25:28
but you also that's where i talked about
25:30
the investing in yourself
25:32
yeah and that's not just going out and
25:33
taking a class but that's also
25:36
becoming aware about who you are
25:37
spending your time with
25:39
and maybe you don't have that in your
25:40
corporate environment but you have to
25:42
find that support system
25:43
outside of that you have to you have to
25:45
become self-aware about who am i
25:47
spending most of my time with
25:49
what are they putting into my spirit and
25:52
sometimes it's other people
25:53
sometimes you have to go to other things
25:56
like reading books
25:57
podcasts being aware of what you listen
26:00
to what you watch on television like all
26:02
of that stuff influences us
26:04
and it's up to us in terms of what we
26:06
put in our spirit
26:07
and then what happens is you start to
26:09
pump that positivity into your
26:12
body yeah then if your corporate
26:14
environment is bad you're going to
26:16
feel it every day and you're going to be
26:18
inspired to say you know what this isn't
26:20
the right place for me i need to pivot i
26:22
need to find a way out of this situation
26:24
yeah because it just doesn't sit right
26:26
with your spirit anymore
26:27
if you're dealing with the situation
26:29
this is what i advise people because
26:31
i believe everybody in some part of
26:32
their journey is going to go through
26:33
that it's literally part of the process
26:35
of life
26:36
you got two you got really you really
26:37
have two options uh you can give voice
26:39
to it
26:40
and figure out how you make your make
26:42
your voice heard and figure out ways to
26:44
take some corrective
26:46
action for yourself and within the
26:47
institution and you do that it may not
26:50
work the second one is to get a plan and
26:51
exit
26:52
right and while you're while you're in
26:53
the process
26:55
really building i think you really said
26:57
it well and what i want to really
26:58
capture is that
27:00
really make sure that you are guarding
27:02
your spirit
27:03
your time your essence all those things
27:05
matter and you
27:06
and if you're in a corporate environment
27:08
that you have to stay in then you need
27:10
to be really intentional you should do
27:12
this anyway and i've learned this over
27:13
the years be really intentional about
27:14
who you spend time with because they
27:16
will
27:17
infect and affect you period in the
27:19
discussion so
27:21
if you want to be a change agent you're
27:22
not going to have the energy to do it
27:24
if all of your time is spent with people
27:27
that are emotionally draining you
27:29
uh doug can i add something you know i
27:31
was gonna go to your next anyway go
27:32
ahead
27:33
well i i just want to say because i
27:36
believe in that i believe those are
27:37
the two things that you really need to
27:39
do and i think that pam is on the right
27:41
track in describing that
27:42
and that we are going to feel it and and
27:45
so while you're going to be influenced
27:47
by what you're surrounded by
27:48
you will know you will know in your true
27:50
center but i also want to say that
27:53
we as a minority in this country
27:57
need to recognize that come to terms
27:59
with the fact that
28:00
you know our numbers we're about a fifth
28:03
of of the country
28:04
uh latinx people are are going to be
28:07
closer to the majority before black
28:10
people are
28:11
in this country and so we're going to be
28:13
in the minority for a long time in
28:15
america and i feel like one of the
28:18
opportunities that we may have
28:20
is some of our energy and spirit is so
28:23
strong
28:24
that we need to take those five people
28:26
or the the boardroom or whoever we're
28:28
surrounded by
28:29
and push that and and maybe begin to
28:32
change their minds
28:33
and maybe in our differences in our
28:35
diversity begin to make them feel
28:37
uncomfortable
28:38
you know and begin to push so that you
28:41
know because we're never going
28:43
you know what i mean i mean because
28:44
we're never i know you are
28:46
right we're never going to i shouldn't
28:48
say never but it's unlikely that we're
28:50
going to be in a situation where we are
28:52
not surrounded by a majority
28:54
and so we're going to have to create
28:57
spaces or recreate spaces that we find
29:00
ourselves in
29:01
so when we find ourselves in an
29:03
organization where we are
29:04
the only african-american person we
29:07
shouldn't say well i'm very
29:08
uncomfortable i'm going to leave
29:09
until i can find a majority black place
29:11
if you can find one
29:13
awesome go do that but we might have to
29:16
change that organization
29:17
from within and say you guys are going
29:20
to have to start
29:22
talking more like i want to talk right
29:25
because i'm going to need that
29:26
and i'm i'm i'm one out of 10 in this
29:29
room so i'm going to need every third
29:31
monday
29:31
or something is going to be doug's day
29:34
but we are going to change together
29:36
and you're going to come around my way a
29:38
little bit i'm not just going to come
29:40
towards you yeah you're actually going
29:41
to do some changing towards me
29:43
that's a level of bravery i think and
29:45
risk
29:46
that we need to start having that
29:48
conversation
29:50
completely agree and if i may add on to
29:52
that which is
29:53
you know everybody is totally speaking
29:56
the truth i also want to just add the
29:58
converse to that that you know
29:59
in that corporate environment you might
30:00
get fired it happens
30:03
you know what i mean and and so i've
30:05
i've definitely experienced that to
30:06
where i've been in the corporate
30:07
environment
30:08
and i'm attempting to hold on to my
30:10
sense of self
30:11
right but of course there's some there's
30:14
some clash there and so you know at the
30:15
end of the day i had to choose me
30:17
right so uh you know that's totally a
30:19
possibility too so
30:21
yeah and that's okay no yeah and that's
30:23
okay like we
30:24
you don't want to hold on to a a job
30:28
uh and i know people have to eat but you
30:30
have to develop a here's what you should
30:31
do develop a skill set
30:33
develop as many relationships as you can
30:35
and i promise you'll be able to figure
30:36
your way out like
30:38
that that's how i looked at everything
30:39
like i have a similar situation too
30:41
and i if you don't know my background i
30:44
i am a lawyer
30:45
but i don't like that's not the part i
30:47
like like i don't like being a lawyer
30:48
nothing wrong with it
30:49
uh i became a lawyer to understand the
30:50
law to learn how to change it but then i
30:52
got sidetracked and with corporate law
30:54
and it just it wasn't rob richardson
30:55
that doesn't fit me like it
30:57
the paycheck was good so i'll be very
30:59
honest i looked at it initially like
31:00
maybe i can learn to like it and no it
31:02
wasn't a good fit
31:03
uh it doesn't it doesn't fit with my
31:05
personal
31:06
mission like that's not i'm not
31:08
criticizing people that do it that
31:09
i can't be fulfilled doing that and so i
31:12
mean not not only could i not be the
31:13
change agent i want i wasn't a good fit
31:15
for
31:16
what i'm passionate about like it's just
31:18
and so you have to you have to figure
31:20
that out because
31:21
especially be an entrepreneur it's it's
31:23
if you're not
31:24
you have to work hard the process is
31:26
hard and if you don't enjoy what you're
31:28
aiming towards i'm not saying you're
31:29
going to enjoy every day because that's
31:30
not true there's gonna be a lot of dates
31:31
you don't enjoy
31:32
but if you don't enjoy the journey that
31:34
you're heading towards
31:35
it's gonna be miserable for you no
31:37
matter how much money you make
31:39
so you know i tell people to find a
31:41
problem that you care about
31:42
seek to solve it and you know obviously
31:45
you'll figure out ways to make money but
31:46
that's how
31:47
that's how the money will count will
31:48
come you have to figure out a problem
31:50
and become
31:51
i think it was the um a head of google
31:53
startups joule burger solomon who says
31:55
this he says
31:56
you you fall in love with the problem
31:58
and you'll find the right solution
32:00
people try to fall in love with the
32:01
solution that they think is right
32:03
and they get lost in the process and and
32:05
lose sight of the actual problem and
32:07
that's how
32:07
businesses and people fail so uh
32:10
speaking of a problem
32:11
arise the people trying to solve you
32:13
know back to you when we talk about
32:16
trying to change i think our mindset
32:19
and i'm talking about the black
32:20
community with with money and how we
32:22
think about it
32:24
that is a a task because you know a lot
32:27
of the
32:27
constructs and things that the
32:29
narratives that have been put out there
32:30
so how do we go about we have we're
32:33
we're building the trust
32:35
but how do we go about i would say uh
32:37
trying to get better
32:38
financial habits as a people
32:42
in terms of making that a process like
32:43
this is a because you know habits as you
32:45
know become automatic
32:46
but they they come over time like what's
32:48
the process to doing that and i want to
32:50
then i'm going to to both pam and doug
32:53
to talk about building institutional
32:54
habits
32:55
okay um i think the overarching
32:59
umbrella term here is culture right so
33:02
if we look at
33:03
the larger culture particularly if we
33:05
take a glance at hip-hop
33:07
um i tell people that the sixth element
33:10
of hip-hop is actually entrepreneurship
33:14
and so hip-hop is starting to put that
33:16
into the music the culture's starting to
33:18
talk more about land ownership
33:19
stocks equity and that's starting to
33:21
become a little bit more sexy right so
33:22
that's
33:23
that's one piece of it that i think you
33:25
know is a sign that we're moving
33:26
in the right direction um the next piece
33:29
from a more
33:30
micro perspective which kind of ties
33:32
back to bro capital
33:34
and our model of financial wellness so
33:36
therefore us there are four components
33:38
of financial wellness right the first is
33:41
are you able to take care of your basic
33:42
needs right food clothing shelter right
33:44
okay you got that taken care of nice
33:46
are you able to handle a thousand dollar
33:48
emergency
33:49
right okay you got that taken together
33:51
do you have some capital on hand
33:53
to take advantage of investment
33:55
opportunities as they present themselves
33:57
right
33:58
okay you got that taken care of now
34:00
going back to what uh
34:01
pam was saying what doug was harping on
34:03
you you as well rob is
34:05
that final component that fourth and
34:06
final component that the financial
34:07
services industry has
34:09
overlooked is your two closest
34:11
acquaintances and their ability to take
34:13
care of their basic needs
34:15
thousand dollar emergency and invest
34:16
that will if you've got that together
34:19
then that's how we know that okay you're
34:21
on your way to achieving that financial
34:24
freedom
34:24
and so it's not just you being well
34:27
right it's the people around you being
34:30
well also because
34:31
if you got sick people around you you
34:33
won't be real for long right and so
34:36
even you know thinking about it uh from
34:37
a behavioral economics perspective
34:39
if you're attempting to lose weight
34:42
right
34:43
what do you do you go to an exercise
34:44
class or you get a gym ready right
34:46
there's that level of accountability
34:48
but there's also that level of shared
34:51
destiny
34:51
i don't want to let the group down right
34:53
i'll let myself down but i'm not going
34:54
to let the group down right
34:55
so with bro capital us coming together
34:58
really just from a barbershop
35:00
type of vibe right to where we can share
35:02
ideas
35:03
be transparent be vulnerable uh share
35:06
information but then at the same time
35:08
right there comes that project
35:10
management facilitation
35:12
you're actually helping to answer my
35:13
question and i want to just dive into
35:14
that then go to others
35:16
because you you you make a good point
35:17
right this is comparing this to
35:19
because it's very similar to getting in
35:21
shape losing
35:23
losing weight and that's a shift in
35:25
mentality
35:26
and what it does what you often have to
35:28
do is get rid of habits that you're not
35:30
aware of like okay all of a sudden you
35:32
know at three o'clock i get up to go get
35:33
some cheetos every day and it's a habit
35:35
that's because we don't know what the
35:36
trigger is it's something you got to
35:37
figure out what the trigger is
35:38
and figure out a way one of the best
35:41
books i've ever read it's called the
35:42
power of habit
35:42
and this the statements the statement
35:44
stays with me he said you can't actually
35:46
replace
35:47
you can't you can't actually get rid of
35:48
bad habits you can only replace them
35:50
with good ones
35:51
right so like it's like so how so like i
35:53
guess how do we get people into the
35:55
mindset of understanding do you guys get
35:56
into the mindset of making people
35:58
understand
35:58
how they how the bad decisions
36:01
financially are triggered and how you
36:02
can understand that and move forward
36:04
as a community my question makes sense
36:09
somewhat um around like you say getting
36:11
people to kind of
36:12
take a look at what their behavior is
36:15
and what are they doing and kind of
36:16
redirecting them
36:17
not so much i think it's really more
36:20
through
36:21
through osmosis that we do that right
36:23
where we put you in the group and people
36:24
are sharing information
36:26
about style you you you kind of do do it
36:28
in a way you do it through the aaa way
36:29
right
36:30
right right alcohol economics right what
36:32
they did is they
36:33
to break people out of the habit they
36:34
build the community but they also have a
36:37
set of values to make people understand
36:38
so
36:39
you you you kind of late and function
36:41
yeah exactly yeah exactly you pretty
36:43
much got it yep
36:44
but what about okay uh doug like how do
36:46
you look at
36:48
building uh an institution in a culture
36:52
that is open to being innovative
36:56
that's open to change like how do you
36:58
create that institutional
36:59
dna if it's not initially there we kind
37:01
of said that earlier but
37:03
i kind of want to dive into it like what
37:04
do you recommend to really make it a
37:06
institutional kind of you create
37:08
institutional habits within the
37:10
organization to be inclusive to be open
37:12
to change
37:14
yeah you know i think we need to do
37:15
foundational work and we need to have
37:18
deeper conversations and take our time
37:20
to actually build on that and i
37:22
appreciate what ross is saying
37:23
especially when he says
37:25
barbershop because we all know what that
37:27
means we know that you've got
37:28
time you got an hour just to kick people
37:31
and just
37:32
and just do foundational conversations
37:34
and what
37:35
uh was brought to my mind as you're
37:37
talking about mindset and habits
37:39
um is you know because we come from
37:42
a situation of oppression and because we
37:45
are part of the
37:46
specifically the american system of
37:48
success
37:49
or definitions of success we're immersed
37:52
in it
37:52
um what i think we're really talking
37:54
about is ownership
37:56
and when you're talking about capital i
37:58
appreciate ross also for talking about
37:59
these different kinds of capital
38:01
um we we sometimes have an allergy to
38:04
that ownership we see it coming if you
38:07
do everything right the way ross is
38:09
talking about or the what pam
38:10
the path of pam is following and you
38:13
start a business and you
38:14
you pay off your house and you buy a
38:16
second house and also you're in the real
38:18
estate business
38:19
or if you fix cars real well and you got
38:21
three of them you're a used car salesman
38:23
and you
38:24
you're now an owner and we divorce
38:27
ourselves as a community
38:28
from that person and we think that they
38:31
have done
38:32
something foreign or something has has
38:34
been done wrong
38:35
yeah and i i really hope that you guys
38:37
are are picking up on what i'm saying we
38:40
suddenly that person is no longer a part
38:43
of yeah i do completely and
38:44
yep and and that's foundational
38:48
we had a community at one point uh and
38:51
we've had it several times in our
38:52
history in this country
38:54
in which we gathered together and said
38:56
we're going to build this we're going to
38:57
own that we're going to do this
38:59
collectively but we're going to do this
39:00
individually and we're going to
39:02
celebrate those successes
39:04
and it wasn't just the american uh
39:06
immersion of what that definition of
39:08
success was
39:09
we've got to get back to that so i
39:11
really hope we i'm going to explore more
39:13
ross's concepts of the uh
39:16
the eight different kinds of capital and
39:18
i would include social capital in that
39:20
and again if the people around you are
39:22
doing are not doing well
39:24
then you're not doing it absolutely if
39:26
you're too two closest neighbors our two
39:28
closest friends
39:29
are are suffering you are also suffering
39:32
and so we need to have a different
39:33
community definition
39:35
of of winning that includes
39:39
you know if that person did pay off that
39:41
property and now bought the land next
39:42
door
39:43
they're doing it right how can we help
39:46
them and at the same time you know
39:48
support what they're doing
39:50
and and maintain them as part of this
39:52
community as opposed to othering them
39:54
and saying
39:55
well you're off on your own now i don't
39:56
know what you're doing a big part of
39:58
what you're saying too is looking at
40:00
our relationship as a black community
40:01
with money because it you're
40:03
you're definitely right about that in
40:05
terms of ownership and saying like oh
40:07
that's something foreign to us no no no
40:08
it's not
40:09
and then when it actually happens to i
40:12
do think
40:12
because it's still usually new um
40:16
there's not that talk about generational
40:18
and the passing of the wealth
40:20
so you look at you know god rest his
40:23
soul chadwick bozeman right he
40:25
literally knew he was dying and
40:28
had a wife and had a kid and then there
40:31
was no
40:33
will or trust and and this is this is
40:35
not
40:36
unusual for the community like this is
40:37
something that usually happens because
40:39
we don't like to have the conversation
40:41
about talking about money and death but
40:43
death is going to happen to everybody
40:45
and and so we
40:47
there has to be this because what
40:48
happens is if that business or whatever
40:50
goes away then
40:51
we've just lost that opportunity for
40:53
generational wealth to help not only
40:54
your family but the community too
40:56
and i've seen that happen a lot in our
40:58
community
40:59
and i think we have to have a different
41:01
conversation about finances
41:03
wealth and everything else and about how
41:05
we're really going to change the
41:07
trajectory and part of it is like you
41:10
said changing the whole narrative and
41:11
changing the whole relationship with
41:12
money
41:13
and with ownership you know pam can you
41:15
talk about what
41:16
you know you might have had actually
41:18
experienced
41:19
in this conversation in terms of taking
41:22
ownership
41:23
being a black woman and the challenges
41:26
you might have had internally and how
41:27
you've tried to change the narrative and
41:28
change the conversations
41:30
yeah no i mean just
41:34
yeah as i answer that question i want to
41:36
kind of piggyback on one thing that doug
41:37
said
41:38
and rise it comes to education right
41:41
we're not educated about
41:43
how money works and we also have to
41:46
realize the system
41:47
is not necessarily set up for us to win
41:51
it is easier for me to go out and
41:55
literally buy a bugatti to borrow than
41:58
it is for me to get a small business
41:59
loan
42:00
and i know that firsthand because i have
42:04
tried to get small business loans and i
42:07
can go out and buy a brand new
42:09
100 000 mercedes truck
42:13
and be in and out of the dealership in
42:16
a couple hours and it took
42:20
months four or five months for me to get
42:23
my first small business loan which was
42:27
less than half of the cash capital
42:30
that i had in my bank account to fund my
42:33
business wow
42:35
and so the system is not set up
42:38
per se for us to win they may it's
42:40
easier to acquire
42:42
debt than it is to build walls because
42:45
they're comfortable with you being a
42:46
consumer but not an owner clearly
42:48
exactly and that's where you know
42:50
businesses like ryze's business where
42:53
we're trying to educate
42:55
our people about what it means to build
42:58
generational wealth
42:59
and and again it goes back to what we
43:02
talked about earlier as being the change
43:04
that you want to see but it it come
43:06
it starts with education and a lot of
43:09
times we're just not educated i wasn't
43:11
educated you know i thought
43:14
okay i you know i have a good job i have
43:17
a 401k
43:18
i have money in my savings account i
43:21
have
43:21
a 700 plus credit score i can go buy a
43:25
house after house after house car after
43:28
car i should be able to get a small
43:29
business loan like this
43:32
no sir like it was just not
43:35
and so the system is not rolling yeah
43:44
[Laughter]
43:50
oh you want to build a spirits business
43:52
in northeast ohio well
43:54
let us try to roll the decks and see how
43:56
many people have done that that look
43:58
like you
43:59
oh zero okay you're not gonna be
44:01
successful because then you don't fit
44:03
the profile right i don't look like mark
44:06
zuckerberg
44:07
so i can't build a multi-billion dollar
44:09
business right
44:10
and that's what you're up against and so
44:14
it starts with education and and like i
44:17
said it starts with
44:19
somebody taking that first step and then
44:21
again going back to surrounding
44:23
ourselves with other people
44:25
there are so many people in this
44:26
industry and
44:28
i learned i've probably learned this
44:30
year alone with everything that's
44:32
happened in 2020 as crazy as it's been
44:35
i didn't even realize how many black
44:36
spirits businesses were out there
44:39
but because it became you know
44:42
i'll say more popular or we decided to
44:45
take a day to
44:46
buy black right right everybody started
44:49
calling me
44:50
everybody started putting out lists like
44:52
oh support black business do this
44:54
and you know i was excited about the
44:57
movement but then part of me was like
44:58
i've been black this whole time
45:06
are we doing it on this random tuesday
45:08
like i'm in blacks right
45:10
because it should be it should be uh
45:12
institutional cultural habit
45:14
to support each other and we're not
45:16
there yet but we are at i hope
45:18
this moment this is certainly a critical
45:20
juncture
45:21
in a moment in time where we can figure
45:24
out a way to organize
45:25
internally that we that we are more
45:28
conscious of how to go about doing this
45:29
in the future because
45:30
pam i think it's key and and just very
45:32
quickly this is what we're
45:34
you know disruption now we're building
45:35
we're building a platform to do just
45:37
that and we're going to do crowd
45:38
investing
45:38
to help more of us invest in us because
45:40
we don't have to
45:42
here's a good thing there's enough
45:43
people with enough money where we can
45:45
invest in each
45:46
other we've seen that we've had some
45:48
successful uh raises i know we've had
45:50
we've had uh
45:50
don dixon on the show who's done crowd
45:52
investing i think angela didn't there's
45:53
no
45:54
they didn't get money traditionally so
45:56
crowd investing
45:57
we have we have a crowd investing
45:59
platform that is geared towards
46:01
us we can invest more in us than we
46:02
should so you know i definitely want to
46:04
work with you guys on that we expect to
46:06
roll out early next year
46:07
but we have to really look at how we we
46:10
have to
46:11
we have to both change the system we
46:13
have to still challenge it and we also
46:15
have to challenge ourselves
46:16
internally to not accept the constructs
46:19
and the narratives that are put forward
46:20
because
46:21
if we're honest we do a lot and we have
46:24
to
46:24
we have to reject it we like why is it i
46:27
mean it's not only it's not only white
46:28
people that
46:29
that that feel that way about a black
46:31
woman owning the spirit business
46:32
my guess is there's a lot of black
46:34
people that
46:35
either say it uh they'll say it
46:38
explicitly or they'll think it
46:39
implicitly but either way it's something
46:42
we have to figure out how to throw out
46:43
completely because it's really holding
46:45
us back so i i do think
46:46
i commend you for all of you for what
46:49
you're doing to be
46:50
change agents as we finish up i want to
46:52
have i want to ask one last question
46:54
when you're when you're looking at being
46:56
a change agent and you're changing
46:58
minds concepts communities it's a
47:02
long-term game
47:03
so with that how do you measure success
47:07
anybody can start rise we'll start with
47:08
you sure um
47:11
man so that's that's that's a great
47:12
question for us bro capital
47:14
we're not your average startup right
47:16
because most startups are looking
47:18
to sell off within five to ten years
47:21
right
47:21
we came into the game understanding that
47:24
we are
47:24
an institution and we're going to be
47:26
here for at least 100 years right to
47:29
pass on to our children and their
47:30
children
47:31
um but how do we measure our success as
47:34
we're
47:35
on that road to 100 right i would say
47:38
that we measure it based upon how many
47:40
people
47:40
we're impacting along the way so with
47:43
our model we've had bros who were able
47:45
to
47:46
you know put a down payment on their
47:48
first home where
47:49
you know the money that they were saving
47:51
up they were able to draw from that oh
47:53
we've had bros who lost their jobs and
47:55
were able to use their nest egg or bros
47:57
who
47:57
you know had a expanding their family
47:59
new child on the way so
48:01
you know and interviewing these bros and
48:02
learning about these different scenarios
48:04
to where
48:05
these would have been insurmountable
48:06
hurdles had they not
48:08
been tied in and plugged in with what
48:10
world capital is doing so
48:12
um again man just you know measuring
48:15
how people are being affected by what
48:18
you're doing
48:19
as you're going along will give you you
48:21
know insights into are you going in the
48:23
right direction and if you are
48:25
then just keep following that north star
48:26
keep doing what you're doing yeah
48:28
pam yeah no
48:31
how we measure successes our ability to
48:34
give back within a community
48:36
our ability to create jobs
48:40
within the different communities that
48:41
we're impacting
48:43
because we are a spirits business you
48:46
know
48:46
there's some stigma that comes along
48:48
with that
48:49
but at the end of the day
48:52
as a people we probably spend more in
48:55
this market than anybody else
48:57
so i want to be able to take our funds
49:00
and then
49:01
turn around and reinvest it back into
49:04
the things that got me to where i am you
49:06
know i grew up in math and engineering
49:08
so we have an outreach program that
49:10
gives back to young girls
49:12
going through stem courses um which is
49:15
science
49:16
technology engineering and math remind
49:18
me i got to introduce you to whitney
49:20
gaskins if you don't know her but go
49:21
ahead
49:22
okay yeah absolutely so you know just
49:24
our
49:25
again just being that change letting
49:27
people see that but then continuing to
49:29
funnel
49:30
jobs and money back into our community
49:32
to build up that next generation of
49:34
leaders that's how we measure success so
49:36
every year is we try to hit certain
49:38
milestones in terms of revenue in terms
49:40
of distribution
49:42
in terms of getting the product out
49:44
there we also take a percentage of that
49:46
and put it back into the community and
49:48
bring it on the next
49:50
group of young leaders and change agents
49:52
in the world
49:54
all right doug i have very similar
49:57
measures of success as
49:59
as both of you i will say that i'm
50:01
highly concerned with digital wellness
50:03
so each individual who can gain
50:06
the advantages of technology and use
50:09
that to make a better life for
50:10
themselves and i will add
50:12
uh using technology to get into
50:15
technology as a career field
50:17
uh people there are real solid incomes
50:19
that are there and none of these
50:21
measures of success
50:23
let go of profit or or those kinds of
50:25
things i believe
50:26
because each individual who becomes
50:28
self-sustaining
50:29
and capable of participating in the
50:31
economy is good for
50:33
all of our businesses i have come at
50:35
this from an economic development
50:36
standpoint both
50:38
working with the city with the region in
50:39
central ohio and with the state of ohio
50:42
that the next great frontier of economic
50:46
development
50:46
won't be in getting a headquarters to
50:48
come to your community
50:50
it will be exceeding a number of
50:52
businesses that's where the jobs are
50:54
going to come from
50:56
and the incomes in the home ownership
50:58
and the drop in crime
51:00
and the better education and the college
51:02
and the scholarships
51:03
all of that is going to come from the
51:05
businesses that are going to be founded
51:07
in the communities where they've been
51:09
redlined against for all this time so
51:11
and just one more plug for pam all those
51:14
of us out there who are trying to give
51:16
her a hard time for bringing spirits as
51:19
a business into our community
51:20
we are clearly enjoying spirits
51:24
why not enjoy them why not own
51:27
that company right i mean clearly so
51:31
i am your advocate pam i've got you and
51:33
i will be buying some
51:34
now that i know about you so it's good
51:36
yeah i have you back on the podcast too
51:39
uh individually we'll talk about it in
51:41
uh i'm proud of
51:42
all the work that all three of you are
51:44
doing look forward to us working
51:45
together more
51:46
i want to thank you all for listening
51:48
and tuning in i'm rob richardson with
51:50
disruption now you can visit me at
51:51
disruptionnow.com
51:53
where we like to disrupt common
51:54
narratives and constructs to empower
51:56
black and brown communities
51:57
i appreciate all of you being on and
51:59
this is a great session
52:00
thanks so much rob thank you

HOSTED BY

ROB RICHARDSON

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“A leader in change.”

Being a change leader is really hard especially in addressing issues of race and equity. What is the best approach to leading an environment that needs change where the culture is resistant to change? This was taped as part of the Global Entrepreneurship Week in Ohio.

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Rob Richardson

Entrepreneur & Keynote Speaker

Rob Richardson is the host of disruption Now Podcast and the owner of DN Media Agency, a full-service digital marketing and research company. He has appeared on MSNBC, America this Week, and is a weekly contributor to Roland Martin Unfiltered.

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